Veteran’s Day: Our Heroes, Our Homeless

November 11, 2007

Who are homeless veterans?

The U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) says the nation’s homeless veterans are mostly males. The majority are single, most come from poor, disadvantaged communities, 45% suffer from mental illness, and half have substance abuse problems. They have served in every war from the second World War to Iraq.

How many homeless veterans are there?

The VA estimates that nearly 200,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. And nearly 400,000 experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out of every three homeless men who is sleeping in a doorway, alley or box in our cities and rural communities has put on a uniform and served this country.

Why are veterans homeless?

In addition to the complex set of factors affecting all homelessness — extreme shortage of affordable housing, livable income, and access to health care — a large number of displaced and at-risk veterans live with lingering effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and substance abuse, compounded by a lack of family and social support networks.

Doesn’t the Department of Veterans Affairs take care of homeless veterans?

With an estimated 400,000 veterans homeless at some time during the year, the VA reaches 25% of those in need. For more information about VA homeless veteran programs, go to www.va.gov/homeless/.

What services do veterans need?

Veterans need a coordinated effort that provides secure housing and nutritional meals; essential physical health care, substance abuse aftercare and mental health counseling; and personal development and empowerment. Veterans also need job assessment, training and placement assistance.

The solution?

I don’t know. More government money, more private charity, and more awareness would be a start. But on a personal level, I think the first step is just keeping in mind when you see the homeless on our streets that many of them fought for our country.  I also think this is a cause that organized religion really can and often does step up for.  I know personally, my church and the Catholic church in general does a lot to help the plight of the homeless.

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Veteran’s Day: Some Facts

November 11, 2007


  • At 11 minutes past the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, the “War to End All Wars,” “The Great War,” World War I officially came to an end. A year later, President Woodrow Wilson called on the nation to observe Armistice Day and honor the soldiers who had served in World War I; in 1926, Congress declared it an official federal holiday.
  • The purpose of Veterans Day and Memorial Day are often confused. Memorial Day is for honoring military personnel who died in service to their country. Veterans Day is for thanking ALL men and women who have served honorably in the military during times of war and peace.
  • Over 48 million Americans have served in the military during war and peace since 1776.
  • There are currently about 25 million living veterans.
  • Of the 25 million living veterans, most (75 percent) served during a war or an official period of hostility.
  • About one in four homeless people are veterans.
  • 43% of homeless males over 25 are veterans.
  • In contrast to earlier American wars, where only men engaged in combat, many veterans returning from today’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are women. The new study found that female veterans are more likely to be homeless than non-veteran females, and that overall, female veterans are more likely to be homeless than their male counterparts.

Hear what a “real” soldier has to say

September 29, 2007

I was reading the Huffington Post, and one of the best features is that there are so many guest bloggers. One guest is John Soltz, he is the chair of VoteVets.org and in an Iraq and Kosovo veteran. He is from Pittsburgh, and attended the University of Pittsburgh for grad school. He is considered one of the major voices on veteran and military issues. He has written a post in response to Rush Limbaugh’s disrespectful and uneducated statements. Limbaugh referred to the men and women of the armed forces that denounce the war in Iraq after they return from service the “phony soldiers”.

Jon Soltz’s Response to Rush Limbaugh

If you want to hear crazy Rush’s “phony soldiers” bit, here it is. limbaugh-20070926-soldiers.mp3

For some reason the video i had about it just won’t work. So this is old school mp3, but I think it should work.


Peter Pace raging homo or regular ole bigot?

September 28, 2007

Yeah, yeah I know there is no reason to believe Peter Pace is a homosexual, but that isn’t stopping me from thinking it. For the second time, he has felt it necessary to verbal degrade the brave men and women who service our country, by implying their sexual identify affects them as soldiers.

March 12: “I believe homosexual acts between two individuals are immoral and that [the U.S. military] should not condone immoral acts…I do not believe the United States is well served by a policy that says it is okay to be immoral in any way…As an individual, I would not want [acceptance of gay behavior] to be our policy.” He went on to say he did support the official “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy.

March 17: “In expressing my support for the current policy, I also offered some personal opinions about moral conduct. I should have focused more on my support of the policy and less on my personal moral views.”

September 26: “We should respect those who want to serve the nation but not through the law of the land, condone activity that, in my upbringing, is counter to God’s law.”

“I would be very willing and able and supportive” to changes to the policy “to continue to allow the homosexual community to contribute to the nation without condoning what I believe to be activity — whether it to be heterosexual or homosexual — that in my upbringing is not right”

Why he feels he is in the position to make these judgments about soldier’s private life, or why he feels compelled to share his personal judgments in a public forum is beyond me. Hopefully his replacement will be a little more mindful of separate of church and state.

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