Anti-Meth Ad

April 2, 2008

I came across this jarring anti-meth ad and decided to post it.  Not that I think any of my readers are users, but a lot of us know people who do or have used meth in the past.  People tend to assume it is relatively safe, especially since there are prescription versions available.  But its not.   It is highly addictive and potentially deadly.  But I think the side of meth that is often down played is the aggressive behavior that sometimes accompanies it, that i why i like this commercial.

What do you think?

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Breast Cancer Drug Approved

February 23, 2008

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In a controversial move, the FDA has approved Avastin for breast cancer.  The drug is already used in lung and colon cancer.  For the FDA to approve a late stage cancer drug it needs to either extend patient’s lives or import the quality of life.  Avastin has shown neither and so the advisory committe recommended against its use in breast cancer.  The FDA went against the recommendation of its advisory committee.  The drug does shrink tumors effectively, but there is a debate if that alone is reason to approve a drug.

If you still die in the same amount of time in the same painful way was having smaller tumors  worth whatever adverse effects or side effects come from the medicine?  There are pros and cons to the decision.  The pros are the approval will stimulate even more research and development into tumor shrinking medicines.  The decision will also be good for business, stimulating development and growth.  But there are also cons.  First there is the obvious problem if a drug does not extend life or improve quality of life what is the purpose.  Tumor shrinking is important, but only as a part of the overall picture of improving health.  But what I find to be a more glaring problem is, the advisory committees are designed to have more knowledge and to have looked at a topic more carefully to give the FDA an intelligent recommendation.  Why have them if you don’t listen to the recommendation?  I think that sets bad precedent.

Hopefully the next large study of Avastin will show marked improvement in combination with  other drugs in the treatment of breast cancer.


One Hot Cookie (Literally)

November 14, 2007

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2 SIU students accused of using hot cookies to burn man

November 7, 2007EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. — Two students at Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville kidnapped, paddled and burned a young man with fresh-baked cookies after a drug deal went bad, prosecutors said. Rosario James, 23, and Jordan Sallis, 20, were charged Monday with aggravated kidnapping, robbery and aggravated battery.

Sheriff’s Capt. Brad Wells said that on Friday night, three men went to James’ house to buy marijuana, but two of them grabbed the drugs and fled. He said the suspects held the third man, demanded $400, beat the man with a wooden paddle, and burned his neck and shoulders with fresh-baked cookies. AP

This is some serious baking.  Next time you plan to jack a drug dealer, check he hasn’t been baking all day.  I think an event like this really gives some street cred to Weeds (an excellent Showtime series).  The terms “half-baked” and “baked” might be a little more literal than imagined.  To prove these guys weren’t just cookie making monsters, they made sure to utilize shaving, peeing, and old school violence to intimidate the thief.

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Got allergies? Need relief? Thank George

September 30, 2007

For some people allergies and allergic reactions can be terrible. For example Alex is a gross to be near booger-bag for several weeks a year, and Christina has an itch fest when exposed to sulfonamides. I am lucky enough to only be mildly allergic to Tide and tomato plants, but I do seem to be developing an allergy to my basement, or the fluffy cat that lives there. But when your eyes puff up, or hives appear, or your nose is running, or you can’t stop sneezing what do we turn to? Benadryl. I thought a brief mention of the man behind Benadryl would be worth posting. I am not sure if it is all pharmacy schools or just Temple, but antihistamines come up at least 3 times a day. Somehow my professors can work it into any lesson (from anatomy to immunology to pharmaceutics or even medicinal chemistry)

George Rieveschl, a chemical engineer (not a medical doctor) whom millions of sufferers of allergies, colds, rashes, hives and hay fever can thank for the relief they receive by swallowing a capsule of beta-dimethylaminoethylbenzhydryl ether hydrochloride — the antihistamine he invented and renamed Benadryl — died Thursday in Cincinnati. He was 91

Dr. Rieveschl (pronounced REE-va-shell), who had a Ph.D. in chemistry, was an assistant professor researching muscle-relaxing drugs at the University of Cincinnati in the early 1940s when he realized the powerful potential of that 19-syllable antihistamine compound, then being tested as a muscle relaxer.

Histamines are chemicals made in some cells that can damage the tiny blood vessels called capillaries, allowing blood plasma to leak into body tissues and cause swelling, itching and redness. Antihistamines are manufactured compounds that block receptors in the capillaries, preventing those irritating and sometimes even fatal effects.

“What George Rieveschl did was synthesize a compound that is much more tolerable because it causes much less drowsiness,” said Dr. I. Leonard Bernstein, a professor of medicine at the University of Cincinnati and a former president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. “It’s a very benign drug that most people can tolerate.”

The discovery of Benadryl was also significant because it was the first finding that specific receptors in capillaries can be affected by different compounds. “So there are now a whole series of antihistamines that will counter these different histamine receptors,” Dr. Bernstein said. “It was a key discovery.” It was also a profitable one.

Based on sales that rose to about $6 million a year by the early 1960s, that proved quite lucrative for him, Dr. Rieveschl told The Cincinnati Post in 1999. However, he said, he did not benefit from the huge profits Parke-Davis made after the Food and Drug Administration allowed Benadryl to become an over-the-counter drug in the 1980s. Sales then jumped to more than $180 million a year.

“He did this on his own, in the days before we had research teams,” Dr. Bernstein added. “He understood this concept because he was a good organic chemist.”

By DENNIS HEVESI

Published: September 29, 2007