Rabbits and Resolutions

January 10, 2008

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I’m back. Sorry about the long absence. First there were finals and then the holidays and working. You know how it goes, excuse after excuse. But I have officially begun my new year today. (It was pushed back 10 days to accommodate a trip.) But I am back home and ready to begin 2008.

Rabbit. Rabbit.

After a decadent trip to Pittsburgh, I am ready to look and move forward towards a better tomorrow. Another year means another birthday, another semester, another tax return, and of course another set of resolutions. My problem, much like the UNs, is that my resolutions often mean nothing. Hopefully by sharing some of my resolutions with you, I will feel a little more pressure to keep them up.

The Resolutions: Blog regularly, not dwell on anything that happened in 2007, move out into my own sweet ass rockstar pad, learn 365 new words, beat all of the guitar hero games, have more craft days, do at least some community service, read 12 books, study for my classes before the exams, attend/listen to all my classes, be sociable at CVS, and the inevitable resolution to get into shape (other than spherical).

According to Wikipedia: “A New Year’s Resolution is a commitment that an individual makes to a project or a habit, often a lifestyle change that is generally interpreted as advantageous.”

You can check out some of the most common resolutions here. If anyone out there is planning any resolutions, share them.

Although this is generally a news/entertainment blog, I intend to have periodic personal updates about where I am at on the resolutions. I can do that, cause I make the rules.

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Crazy for Christmas

December 8, 2007

While its normally against my no lame-old-people -TV policy, I might have to check out HGTV tomorrow night.  Sunday, Dec. 9, @ 9 they are airing a special “What’s With That Decked Out Christmas House?”  I love insanely decked out houses.  I think its great if someone want to be that excited about the holidays.  Plus as a kid, those lights meant Christmas was soon, so it attaches an emotional significance.

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“What’s With That Decked Out Christmas House?”
It’s a holiday twist on the series, What’s With That House? Every neighborhood has one … the house that just doesn’t fit in. And for the holidays, these houses actually go out of their way to stand out! What’s With That Decked Out Christmas House? has host George Gray taking viewers behind the closed doors of the most-talked-about houses in the neighborhood to meet the characters who live there and check out their unique take on holiday decorating.


Jello+Booze=I’m in!

December 5, 2007

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Jello Shots. They bring to mind different things to different people. For me I think of drinking them until I felt sick at Pitt with Alex, I think about 21st birthdays, I think about taking them continuously while playing board games, I think of the shore, and I think of pure unadulterated trashiness. But with a little modification, the bacchic undergrad drink/snack of choice can be converted into a holiday party favorite. Check out what PopSugar had to say:

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It has recipes for the classic Jello Shot (which done in red and green automatically becomes a holiday treat ), it also has a recipe for “Spiked Punch” jello shots, and my personal favorite the “Margarita Jello Shot”.

Margarita Jell-O Shots

6 oz package of Lime Jell-O
Two cups (16 oz) boiling water
6 oz tequila
2 oz triple sec
1 oz lime juice
1 oz cold water

  1. Empty Jell-O packet into a large bowl or container
  2. Add boiling water to bowl. Whisk together until fully dissolved. About 3 minutes.
  3. Add tequila, triple sec, lime juice and cold water. Whisk together.
  4. Spoon or pour into prepared cups.
  5. Refrigerate until set, at least 3 hours, preferably overnight.

It also has pictures to show you what they should look like, ideas about the colors, and more advanced jello shots.  It shows for all of the less technically skilled folks how you make jello shots that are orange slices.  (Hint: You make a half an orange and cut the slices after the jello sets)

Enjoy!  (Drink Responsibly)


Veteran’s Day: Our Heroes, Our Homeless

November 11, 2007

Who are homeless veterans?

The U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) says the nation’s homeless veterans are mostly males. The majority are single, most come from poor, disadvantaged communities, 45% suffer from mental illness, and half have substance abuse problems. They have served in every war from the second World War to Iraq.

How many homeless veterans are there?

The VA estimates that nearly 200,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. And nearly 400,000 experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out of every three homeless men who is sleeping in a doorway, alley or box in our cities and rural communities has put on a uniform and served this country.

Why are veterans homeless?

In addition to the complex set of factors affecting all homelessness — extreme shortage of affordable housing, livable income, and access to health care — a large number of displaced and at-risk veterans live with lingering effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and substance abuse, compounded by a lack of family and social support networks.

Doesn’t the Department of Veterans Affairs take care of homeless veterans?

With an estimated 400,000 veterans homeless at some time during the year, the VA reaches 25% of those in need. For more information about VA homeless veteran programs, go to www.va.gov/homeless/.

What services do veterans need?

Veterans need a coordinated effort that provides secure housing and nutritional meals; essential physical health care, substance abuse aftercare and mental health counseling; and personal development and empowerment. Veterans also need job assessment, training and placement assistance.

The solution?

I don’t know. More government money, more private charity, and more awareness would be a start. But on a personal level, I think the first step is just keeping in mind when you see the homeless on our streets that many of them fought for our country.  I also think this is a cause that organized religion really can and often does step up for.  I know personally, my church and the Catholic church in general does a lot to help the plight of the homeless.